Todd and Julie Chrisley claim federal tax case against them was based on an illegal search

Chrisley Knows Best’s Todd and Julie Chrisley claim the federal tax case against them should be thrown out based on ‘illegal’ search

  • The reality stars claim financial documents obtained by the state of Georgia were seized with an illegal search warrant and passed on to the feds
  •  They say the warrant was based on a non-existent tax lien and want the documents thrown out of the court case
  • The couple were arrested in August on fraud and tax evasion charges
  • The feds allege they provided false financial statements saying they had more money in the bank than they actually did in order to get millions in loans
  •  Todd and Julie are off the hook in the original Georgia tax evasion case

Todd Chrisley, 50, and his wife Julie Chrisley, 46, contend that federal indictments against them for tax evasion and fraud are based on improperly obtained evidence and should be thrown out.

The Chrisley Knows best stars were previously charged for tax evasion by the state of Georgia, which then sent evidence gathered to the federal government.

But the TV stars say those financial documents were ‘illegally seized’, based on false evidence concocted by the state, according to court documents obtained by TMZ.

Bad warrant: Todd Chrisley, 50, and his wife Julie Chrisley, 46, contending that federal indictments against them for tax evasion and fraud are based on illegally obtained evidence and should be thrown out, according to TMZ; pictured in 2017

Bad warrant: Todd Chrisley, 50, and his wife Julie Chrisley, 46, contending that federal indictments against them for tax evasion and fraud are based on illegally obtained evidence and should be thrown out, according to TMZ; pictured in 2017

The Chrisleys’ documents claim that the Georgia Department of Revenue broke the law in 2017 when it seized two Atlanta storage units containing important financial documents.

The claim in the documents that the original search warrant used a tax lien as justification for the search.

But Todd and Julie contend that there was no lien, invalidating the results of the search.

While Georgia’s case against the reality couple continued, federal prosecutors launched their own case against them.

Upgraded: The Chrisleys were charged with tax evasion by Georgia, which passed on financial documents from two Atlanta storage units to the federal government; pictured in June

Upgraded: The Chrisleys were charged with tax evasion by Georgia, which passed on financial documents from two Atlanta storage units to the federal government; pictured in June

Tainted: But Todd and Julie claim the warrant was based on a non-existent tax lien, and therefore the evidence collected on it should be barred

Tainted: But Todd and Julie claim the warrant was based on a non-existent tax lien, and therefore the evidence collected on it should be barred

The Chrisleys are seeking the return of their documents, and they want them kept out of the trial.

The couple were indicted by a federal grand jury back in August. They allegedly fabricated documents and made false statements to banks in order to obtain millions of dollars in loans between 2007 and 2012.

The indictment alleged that the reality stars pasted together documents to make it look as if they had hundreds of thousands of dollars in their bank account, when in reality the account varied between being empty and being tens of thousands of dollars in the red.

They couple were freed from custody on a $100,000 unsecured bond. 

Todd and Julie got a breath of fresh air in October, when they settled with Georgia on their tax evasion charges.

Rather than owing millions in taxes, the parties eventually agreed that they owed less than $110,000, which has been paid off. 

Inflated estimates: The indictments claim the Chrisleys lied on financial forms to say they had hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank for millions in loans, when they actually had a negative balance

Inflated estimates: The indictments claim the Chrisleys lied on financial forms to say they had hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank for millions in loans, when they actually had a negative balance

The family encountered a setback last month when a judge denied their request to take a week-long vacation around Thanksgiving to the Cayman Islands.

They had offered to travel with temporary passports and to provide a detailed itinerary, but the judge ordered them to stay in the United States.

In addition to being a popular tourist spot, the Cayman Islands are a major offshore financial haven.

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